Email Updates from EASST

Children’s Road Safety

Over 500 children are killed on the world’s roads every day, while road traffic collisions are the leading cause of death in every world region for young people aged 15-29 years.

In Tajikistan children account for around 20% of those injured on the roads – the WHO Global Status Report does not give separate national data for child road casualties but such a risk rate that may be reflected in other countries in the EASST region.

Children's Road Safety Education Project in Moldova

Road Safety Education Pack

EASST’s experience in the region is that most of the educational materials specifically addressing children are not age-appropriate or appropriate in terms of their content. It is typical that leaflets for children contain information on ‘rules of the road’, i.e. speed limits, street signs, and legislation. There is very little to assist young children in learning to cross the road safely which is a key risk factor for children of all ages.

EASST’s open use Education Pack aimed at 3 age groups: children under 6 (pre-school age in EASST partner countries); children 6-11 years old; children 12-14 has been designed specifically to reflect the risks, challenges and conditions in low and middle-income countries, and have the widest relevance possible.

Child restraints

The probability of children aged 1-7 years being injured in a crash or sudden stop is reduced by around 70% when an appropriate child restraint is used instead of a seat belt only. Child restraints are a vital protection for child passengers.

Of our 11 current EASST partner countries, only four have legislation both requiring child restraints and restricting child passengers in the front seats of vehicles. Four EASST partner countries have no legislation at all in this area, but even where legislation is comprehensive very many families still do not use child restraints. One reason for this is the prohibitive cost of child car seats in low income countries. In Moldova a child car seat costs more than the average monthly wage, and could cost the equivalent of three months’ income for families in rural villages. For families with many children, providing them all with child restraints is simply impossible. Awareness of the importance of child restraints is often also low, and enforcement is carried out reluctantly by the police.

Working with the Kier Group EASST sends regular donations of children’s car seats, as well as reflective clothing, to villages across the region. Our work also involves campaigning for improvements in terms of public policy and practice, to raise awareness and improve enforcement.

Safe to School

A danger point for many children is the road area surrounding schools, where road design is often flawed, speeds are poorly enforced and the mix of pedestrian traffic, public transport and private vehicles dropping off children is often hazardous.

EASST partners have been working with local stakeholders to improve matters and implement ‘Safe to School: Safe to Home’ initiatives under the umbrella of the EU TRACECA Road Safety II project. These projects were successful in identifying risks, engaging teachers and parents, and improving speed enforcement locally. They also resulted in improvements in local road design near the target schools and other safety gains.

The TRACECA Road Safety II project ended in 2016 but EASST partners are carrying on this work with the pilot schools and will take the project to new schools to build on their successful results. 

News Results for Children’s Road Safety

Are parents keeping their children safe in cars?

21st June 2017 The Automobile Club of Moldova evaluate the implementation of new laws on child restraint systems in Chisinau.


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Kyrgyzstan children receive “new and refreshing” Road Safety education

19th June 2017 Road Safety Kyrgyzstan use EASST Road Safety Education Pack to offer new perspective on road safety learning.


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Local children call for urgent action to improve road safety in Kazakhstan

19th June 2017 EASST partner, Common Road NGO, visit four cities across Kazakhstan to raise awareness of road safety and call on local authorities to improve road safety infrastructure for children.


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